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Telling The Kids That You Are Going To Die

GRAYSLAKE, Illinois (AP) -- Seven-year-old Nicholas Chamernik had rarely seen his parents cry. So he felt a pang of worry when he looked up one evening to see his father wiping away tears.

"Dad, what's wrong?" he asked.

Jim Chamernik was too choked up to respond. After 18 months of grasping for answers, he and his wife, Aimee, finally had an explanation for symptoms Aimee had been having -- slurred speech and weakness in her right arm among them. The diagnosis was Lou Gehrig's disease, a degenerative condition of the nervous system, also known as ALS.

There is no cure. But how could they explain that to their eldest son, the first in the family to notice his mom's slurring, when she read him bedtime stories?

How, they wondered, do you tell a child that his mom is dying?
Wow. That has got to be so darn hard. I can't imagine being placed in that position.

Comments

Unknown said…
I come from a Pacific Island nation called Papua New Guinea. My country shares borders with Indonesia, Australia and Solomon Islands..I usual search on Youtube any interesting documentaries. Whilst looking up youtube videos I came across a documentary on people who suffer ALS and their real treatment from www.multivitamincare.org. I for had never heard of this crippling and debilitating disease affecting a lot of Americans. It is very torturous to watch and hear patients who suffer. It is more like a combination of various diseases all put into one. Like a person who has suffered a stroke, plus someone suddenly becoming paralysed, cancer etc. but I also get to know understand that there has been successful cure to this disease from multivitamin care. It is too much for a patient to endure such as they slowly begin to pass away if the right medication is not taken .Having a positive mind is a powerful tool .My prayers goes out to ALS patients and their care givers.